Thursday, April 14, 2011

Classic movies that I somehow missed

I'm not feeling particularly motivated at the moment to add any setting details today, so for today's useless off-topic update, I'm going to make a partial list of classic movies that I somehow never saw, feel kind of embarrassed that I missed, and will be making an effort through Netflix to get caught up.

  1. The Godfather

  2. Lawrence of Arabia

  3. Doctor Zhivago

  4. Breakfast at Tiffany's

  5. The Searchers

  6. Rosemary's Baby

  7. American Grafitti

  8. South Pacific (I have seen the play of this, though, actually)

  9. Exodus

  10. Cool Hand Luke

5 comments:

Tequila Sunrise said...

The Godfather is a fun film, but Lawrence of Arabia was a big disappointment. It's three and a half hours of your life that you'll never get back.

Mistwell said...

Funny, I felt of all those films, Lawrence of Arabia was the only must-see. It's one of the most incredible films I've ever seen on the big screen. And, it's what Anakin turning to the dark side should have looked like, if Lucas had done it right.

Joshua said...

I loved the look of Lawrence. Didn't like much of anything else about it, though, sadly. O'Toole's cryptic dialogue didn't help either.

Anonymous said...

I think that if anyone has a real interest in history, or any understanding of it, Lawrence of Arabia is a very satisfying movie, esp. for those familiar with that period. For those who are not -- it's a great primer, and everyone really should have some understanding of how things got the way they are now.

Granted, there is some slight mucking about with specifics and obviously some of the conversations and events have to be invented, but most are very consistent with what is known about Lawrence and his history -- much of which will never be known exactly (like his sexual tendencies)

Joshua said...

I have a great interest in history, although I profess to not have much knowledge about that particular time/region, and my knowledge of the real T. H. Lawrence is limited to what I've read on Wikipedia.

However, the movie still suffers from a deplorable lack of editing and a great deal of cryptic dialogue and murky motivations. Historical in basis or not, the movie was still a movie, not a documentary, and I thought as such, it failed to make a concerted effort to entertain the audience, or present a reasonable script, or any of the other things that one expects from mainstream movie.